POLITECNICO DI MILANO EUROPEAN COMMISION

Regione Lombardia

Camera di Commercio di Milano

WABT

World Academy of Biomedical Technologies

with the High Patronage of President of Republic of Italy

 

DETECTION AND MULTIMODAL ANALYSIS OF BRAIN WEAK SIGNALS TO STUDY BRAIN FUNCTION AND DISEASE 

28-29 November 1997, Politecnico di Milano
Via Bonardi, 3 - Aula N multimediale

 

Workshop Coordinator

Prof. Alberto Rovetta

Members of Organizing Committee

Prof. Jacques Chambron, Prof. Jari Karhu, Prof. Alberto Rovetta, Prof. Harvey J. Sagar

European Commission Scientific Committee

Dott. Umberto Bertazzoni (Secretary), Dr. Etienne Magnien, Dr. L. Matthiessen, Dr. V. Thevenin, Dr. M. Vidal, Dr. Philippe Jehenson

Steering Local Committee

Prof. Paolo Pinelli (Secretary)

Prof. Giuliano Avanzini, Prof. Gabriella Belotti, Prof. Sergio Brofferio, Prof. Giancarlo Comi, Dr. Alessandro Emanueli, Prof. Fulvio Falcone, Dr. Vartan Gianighian, Dr. Cesare Giorgi

Honorary Committee

Prof. Osvaldo De Donato, Dr. Gabriele Albertini, Prof. Adriano De Maio, On. Roberto Formigoni, Prof. Paolo Preziosi, On. Umberto Scapagnini, Prof. Carlo Rubbia, Sen. Antonio Tomassini, Prof. Sergio Sirtori, Dr. Piero Zanello, Prof. Cesare Stevan

Cooperation in the Workshop Activity

Arch. MariaRita Canina, Arch. Rita Pegoraro, Ms. Maria Elena Garavaldi

 

 Premises

Neurological and psychiatric disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, brain stroke, epilepsy, chronic pain, depression, etc. severely impair the life of many European citizens and have heavy costs both for our health budgets and in loss of efficiency in the workplace. More than 30% of medical expenses in Europe concern diseases or disorders of the nervous system.

The development of new diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies are therefore extremely important for the improvement in the quality of life. Detection of weak signals in the nervous system will provide new insight into the functioning of the brain and may enable us to detect early change in the nervous system in relation to diseases or injuries.

Main objectives:

-to present the state of the art of the technology on the detection of weak signals in neurosciences and its applications to medical research and practice as well as to computer science by bringing together the various clinical disciplines making use of weak signals, the technology producers (engineers, mathematicians, etc.) and the industrialists (instrumentation and pharmacology);

-to highlight the future perspectives for the use of detection of weak signals as a mean to better understand the functioning of the brain in health and disease. The ultimate goal being the development of new preventive and therapeutic strategies for neurological diseases or handicaps;

-to present the progress and results of relevant projects funded within EC research programmes;

-to propose a European information network for the use of detection of weak signals in various fields of medical research and practice.

Scientific issues:

The best known examples of technologies based on the detection of weak signals are magnetic resonance and magneto/electro encephalography.Two main scientific issues need to be addressed:

1.The development of new technologies and instrumentation, their advantage compared to the reference technique, i.e. Positron Emission Tomography. The detection of weak signals requires the use of digital processing of signals and new technologies for acquisition and analysis of signals; most recent mathematic methods can be applied for the study of signals, with reference to both dynamic and static ones.

2.The potential applications in the field of neurosciences, medical practice and computer sciences cover the following:

a) Clinically, it may contribute in particular:

-to the detection of active regions in the brain before conservative surgical interventions, in case, for instance, of tumors and epilepsy;

-to the follow-up of rehabilitation after stroke and spinal chord injuries;

-to the follow-up of degenerative pathologies, such as Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis;

-to neuropsychiatry in the monitoring and control of the efficacy and targeting of drugs.

b) In neurophysiology, investigations of cognitive functions and memory in particular will benefit from improved detection of weak signals. Techniques to record and analyse activity in large neuronal populations will provide the possibility to understand the complexity of information processing and cell communication in the nervous system under normal conditions as well as in pathological situations

-It may provide basic knowledge important for the improvement of neuron-silicon interface, and specially neuronal prostheses, such as cochlear implants and for treatment of irretrievable nerve damage and amputated limbs

(an area where Europe is lagging behind US and Japan).

-It may provide advances in understand biological strategies for computation which are important for the development of a new generation of parallel computers.

 

 

 ABSTRACTS

The abstracts are reported following the order of presentation in the Workshop.

 


Friday 28 November 1997

 

2.00 pm Welcome from Adriano DE MAIO, Rector

  •  
  • Addresses from:

    Umberto SCAPAGNINI, President EU Committee

    Roberto FORMIGONI, President Regione Lombardia

    Gabriele ALBERTINI, Mayor of Milan

    Antonio TOMASSINI, Pres. Senate Comm.on Health

    Sergio SIRTORI, Dir. Dept. Mechanics

  •  

    2.30 pm INTRODUCTION:

  •  
  • Alberto ROVETTA, Politecnico di Milano

    Jacques CHAMBRON, Faculté de Médicine de Strasbourg

    Jari KARHU, Kuopio University Hospital

    Harvey J. SAGAR, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield

    Umberto BERTAZZONI Head Medical Research Unit, European Commission

    Etienne MAGNIEN, Head of Biotechnology Unit, European Commission

  •  3.30 pm DETECTION OF FUNCTIONAL SIGNALS: EEG and MEG

  •  
  • Chairman: Jacques CHAMBRON

    Fernando H. LOPES DA SILVA Institute of Neurobiology, University of Amsterdam

    Gerd PFÜRTSCHELLER Dep. of Medical Informatics, University of Technology, Graz

    Lüder DEECKE University Klinik für Neurologie, Vienna

    Arno VILLRINGER Universität Neurologiske Klinik und Poliklinic, Berlin

    Christian DEPEURSINGE EPFL – DMT – ECUBLEUS, Lausanne

    Christoph M. MICHEL Dept. of Neurology, University Hospital of Geneva

  • 4.45 pm Coffee break

     5.00 pm DETECTION OF FUNCTIONAL SIGNALS: fMRI

  •  
  • Chairman: Philippe JEHENSON

    Ewald MOSER Institute of Medical Physics, University of Vienna

    Richard BOWTELL Magnetic Resonance Centre, University of Nottingham

    Chrit MOONEN CNRS / Université Victor Segalen, Bordeaux

    Richard A. LERSKI Medical Physics Dep., Dundee Ninewells Hospital University

    Patrick J. COZZONE CRMBM, Faculté de Médecine, Marseille

    Michel DECORPS Unité INSERM 438, Université Joseph Fourier, Grenoble

    Markus RUDIN Novartis Pharma, Basel, Switzerland

  •  6.30 pm MULTIMEDIAL CONFERENCE

     

    Saturday 29 November 1997

     

    9.00 am MULTIMODAL MODELLING

  •  
  • Chairman: Harvey J. SAGAR

    Claudia TESCHE Low Temperature Lab., Helsinki University of Technology

    Michael SCHERG Dept. of Neurology, University of Heidelberg

    Helmut BUCHNER Neurologische Klinik, RWTH, Aachen

    Risto ILMONIEMI Helsinki University Central Hospital

    Paul MATTHEWS Dep. of Clinical Neurology, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford

    William DEAKIN Rawnsley Building, Manchester Royal Infirmary

  •   David J. BROOKS MCR Cyclotron Unit, Hammersmith Hospital, London

     10.45 am Coffee break

     11.00 am INTEGRATIVE AND BEHAVIORAL MEASURES IN

  •  
  • BASIC NEUROSCIENCE AND CLINICAL APPLICATIONS

    Chairman: Jari KARHU

    Agneta NORDBERG Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge University Hospital

    Giacomo RIZZOLATTI Ist. di Fisiologia Umana, Universitŕ di Parma

    Giovanni BERLUCCHI Dip.di Scienze Neurologiche, Universitŕ di Verona

    Paolo PINELLI Prof. of Neurology e Psychiatry, University of Milan

    Giancarlo COMI Centro Sclerosi Multipla – HSR Milan

  •  12.00 am DISCUSSION ON OBJECTIVES

  •  
  • with the participation of Discussers
  •  1.00 pm Lunch

     2.00 pm REVIEW AND INTERACTIVE DISCUSSION

  •  
  • Review for the present situation and possible further developments.
  •  4.00 pm Coffee break

     4.30 pm FUTURE DIRECTIONS AND OVERVIEW

  •  
  • Launching of proposals for main objectives.
  •  

     6.30 pm CONCLUSIONS